Volume 2, Issue 4, December 2017, Page: 94-98
Measurement of Radioactivity Levels and Assessment of Radiation Hazards for Plants Species Grown at Scrap Yard (B) at Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Site (Iraq)
Hazim Louis Mansour, Department of Physics, College of Education, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Baghdad, Iraq
Yousif Muhsin Zayir Al-Bakhat, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Directorate (RNSD), Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), Baghdad, Iraq
Huda Nassar Karkosh, Department of Physics, College of Education, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Baghdad, Iraq
Received: Oct. 2, 2017;       Accepted: Dec. 27, 2017;       Published: Jan. 15, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ns.20170204.11      View  1011      Downloads  65
Abstract
Samples of flowered grasses, herbs and jungles were collected from scrap yard (B) at Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Site and analyzed in the laboratory using gamma-ray spectroscopy system. The activity concentrations for radionuclides grown on the studied area were found to be ranged from 1.05 to 5.45 Bq/kg (average 2.86 Bq/kg) for 226Ra, below detection limit (BDL) to 1.4 Bq/kg (average 0.16 Bq/kg) for 232Th, 483.2 to 595.7 Bq/kg (average 528.33 Bq/kg) for 40K, and BDL to 1.15 Bq/kg (average 0.35 Bq/kg) for 235U. No radionuclides of artificial origin (such as 137Cs) were detected in any of the analyzed samples. Gamma absorbed dose rates (D), radium equivalent activities (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), and internal hazard index (Hin) were calculated and found to be considerably lower than their corresponding allowable limits and worldwide average values. Accordingly, it was found that natural radioactivity levels for the investigated plants species grown at the studied area pose no significant radiological threat to human health or the environment.
Keywords
Radiation Hazards, Plants Species, Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Site
To cite this article
Hazim Louis Mansour, Yousif Muhsin Zayir Al-Bakhat, Huda Nassar Karkosh, Measurement of Radioactivity Levels and Assessment of Radiation Hazards for Plants Species Grown at Scrap Yard (B) at Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Site (Iraq), Nuclear Science. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2017, pp. 94-98. doi: 10.11648/j.ns.20170204.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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